Elegant Events & Invitations

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Elegant Events & Invitations

How to Address Wedding Invitations Envelopes

Determining the appropriate way to address your wedding invitations envelopes can be a tricky process. Here are our tips so that your invites are everything you want (and NEED) them to be! Find  ways to address your wedding invitation envelopes below. 


Before You Begin

  • Allow plenty of time to address, assemble, and mail all invitations.
  • Order extra envelopes—inner and outer—in case of errors.

 

How to Address the Envelopes

  • Double check the spelling of your guests’ names before addressing the envelopes.
  • Invitations are always addressed to both members of a married couple.

The Inner Envelope

The inner envelope includes the title and last names of the specific people invited. This allows the host to be very clear about who is invited and who is not invited.

If children are invited, but are not receiving a separate invitation, their names may be written on a line below their parents’ names on the inner envelope.

For example, the inner envelope for Mr. and Mrs. James Kidd and the two darling children, Sarah and Jonathan, would be written:

Mr. and Mrs. Kidd

Sarah Kidd

Jonathan Kidd

It’s also fine to write familiar names for close family: Aunt Martha and Uncle Bill.

 

The Outer Envelope

The outer envelope is addressed using titles, first, (middle), and last names.

  • An invitation to an unmarried couple residing at the same address is addressed with both names connected by “and.”
  • No abbreviations or middle initials are used when addressing formal invitations.

Be sure that “Street,” or “Boulevard” are spelled out. State names should be written in full or use the two-letter postal code abbreviation. An invitation to parents and children is addressed to the parents:

Mr. and Mrs. James Kidd

 

How to add “and Guest”

Since it’s awkward and impersonal to address the outer envelope as “Mr. James Smith and Guest,” the two envelope system works well. Address the outer envelope to “Mr. James Smith” and the inner envelope to “Mr. James Smith and Guest.”

 

Forms of Addresses

Traditionally, a woman’s name is listed before a man’s on an envelope address. Nowadays, the order of the names, whether his name or hers comes first, does not matter and either way is acceptable. The exception is when one member of the couple ‘outranks’ the other, the one with the higher rank is always listed first. Here are examples on how to address both the outer and inner envelopes!

Guests

 

Addressing the Outer Envelope Addressing the Inner Envelope
Unmarried Female Miss/Ms. Renee Kidd Miss/Ms. Kidd
Unmarried Female + Guest Miss/Ms. Renee Kidd Miss/Ms. Kidd and Guest
Unmarried Male Mr. John Smith Mr. Smith
Unmarried Male + Guest Mr. John Smith Mr. Smith and Guest

Married Couple:

Same Last Name

Mr. and Mrs. John Smith Mr. and Mrs. Smith
Married Couple:

Same Last Name and Their Children

Mr. and Mrs. John Smith

Mr. and Mrs. Smith

Harry, Larry and Mary

Married Couple:

Different Last Names

Mr. John Smith and Mrs. Jane Ford Mr. Smith and Mrs. Ford
Married Couple:

Different Last Name and Their Children

Mr. John Smith and Mrs. Jane Ford

Mr. Smith and Mrs. Ford

Kayla, Kylie and Lucy

Unmarried Couple:

Living Together

List Male First:

Mr. John Smith and Ms. Jane Ford

Mr. Smith and Ms. Ford

Unmarried Couple:

Not Living Together

Sent to the Friend You Are Closest To:

Mr. John Smith

Mr. Smith and Ms. Ford
Judge The Honorable John Smith Judge Smith

Judge:

Married

The Honorable and Mrs. John Smith Judge and Mrs. Smith
Doctor:

Married

Mr. John Smith and Dr. Jane Ford Mr. Smith and Dr. Ford

 

Special Thanks to: Photography by Southwest Creative Co., Calligraphy by Letters and Such, Location at Legacy Pecans